Viewpoint on Manufacturing

A discussion group for the manufacturing industry.

like0

The Information Black Hole in Manufacturing

dhavas's picture

What do you know about the status of your production floor? What is the status of the current jobs that are on the floor? What are the holdups? Are there yield or scrap problems that you don’t know about? Are your production lines and machines operating as defined on the router? In many companies, this information exists in manual logs and notes on the shop packet paperwork and is usually gathered by the Production Supervisor/Manager at the beginning of the shift. So if a rush order comes in, what’s done?

Quick Changeovers Cut Costs on Small Lot Orders

dhavas's picture

Ok, so you’re getting orders from your customers, but they’ve cut the quantities. So you are faced with smaller orders. Now the problem is that you have an increased number of changeovers to make these shipments. Long changeover and setup times kill productivity and increase costs especially when there are small lot sizes. There is a solution!

Sustainable Manufacturing— The Lean Way

dhavas's picture

A recent buzz word in the manufacturing trade press is “Sustainable Manufacturing.” According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Sustainable Manufacturing is defined as “the creation of manufactured products that use processes which minimize negative environmental impacts, conserve energy and natural resources, are safe for employees, communities, and consumers and are economically sound.” However, right now in this economy for many manufacturing companies the more significant issue is sustaining the business, period.

Eliminating the Hidden Factory: Where Do I Start?

dhavas's picture

In a previous post we talked about the “Hidden Factory” as a cost generator and how to find out how big that hidden factory is. Now that you know about this factory, the question is “Where do you start eliminating it?” The answer lies in the 80-20 Rule which with most all of us are familiar. That is 80% of your hidden factory comes from only 20 percent of the defects that cause rework or scrap. A Pareto analysis is an easy way to see how this happens.

It's All About Controlling Cost!

dhavas's picture

When the economy turns sour and the order book dries up, what does a business owner need to do? Of course, the first thing that comes to mind is to control the bleeding of cash. That means working the receivables to get what’s owed and making sure that expenses are minimized. In manufacturing, sometimes all the reasons for those expenses on the production floor are not completely understood. If the reasons are not known, how can those costs be controlled? It is difficult.

The Information Black Hole in Manufacturing

dhavas's picture

What do you know about the status of your production floor? What is the status of the current jobs that are on the floor? What are the holdups? Are there yield or scrap problems that you don’t know about? Are your production lines and machines operating as defined on the router? In many companies, this information exists in manual logs and notes on the shop packet paperwork and is usually gathered by the Production Supervisor/Manager at the beginning of the shift. So if a rush order comes in, what’s done?

Quick Changeovers Cut Costs on Small Lot Orders

dhavas's picture

Ok, so you’re getting orders from your customers, but they’ve cut the quantities. So you are faced with smaller orders. Now the problem is that you have an increased number of changeovers to make these shipments. Long changeover and setup times kill productivity and increase costs especially when there are small lot sizes. There is a solution!

Sustainable Manufacturing— The Lean Way

dhavas's picture

A recent buzz word in the manufacturing trade press is “Sustainable Manufacturing.” According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Sustainable Manufacturing is defined as “the creation of manufactured products that use processes which minimize negative environmental impacts, conserve energy and natural resources, are safe for employees, communities, and consumers and are economically sound.” However, right now in this economy for many manufacturing companies the more significant issue is sustaining the business, period.

Eliminating the Hidden Factory: Where Do I Start?

dhavas's picture

In a previous post we talked about the “Hidden Factory” as a cost generator and how to find out how big that hidden factory is. Now that you know about this factory, the question is “Where do you start eliminating it?” The answer lies in the 80-20 Rule which with most all of us are familiar. That is 80% of your hidden factory comes from only 20 percent of the defects that cause rework or scrap. A Pareto analysis is an easy way to see how this happens.

It's All About Controlling Cost!

dhavas's picture

When the economy turns sour and the order book dries up, what does a business owner need to do? Of course, the first thing that comes to mind is to control the bleeding of cash. That means working the receivables to get what’s owed and making sure that expenses are minimized. In manufacturing, sometimes all the reasons for those expenses on the production floor are not completely understood. If the reasons are not known, how can those costs be controlled? It is difficult.

No questions have been added to this group.
No polls have been added to this group.

Recent activity in this group

Group contributors

Contributors

Organizers